Expedient Specimen
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6 posts in this topic

I would like to know about the term "Expedient Specimen".
Usually I know "Specimen" is the final sample, but what does "Expedient Specimen" mean?
Does it simply mean that there is no Mihon Stamp?
Is "Expedient Specimen" a note created before "Specimen"?
In countries where English is not a native language, sometimes 'Expedient' interpreted in a negative sense.
Please provide clear rules.

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  • Administrator

Good morning,

Thank you for your message.  I checked with our research department and they advised that it is not a term that we use frequently but when it is used it is usually in the context of notes issued during WWII.  From the information we have, they needed the ability to produce specimens quickly in the field so they just used notes that were intended for circulation (often with issue styled serial numbers) and then just added some sort of specimen marking to make it into a specimen. The term is used the book, WWII Remembers by Schwann-Boling and is the phrasing we would use in those cases. 

If you have any other questions, please let us know.  Thank you!

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Thanks for your kind reply.

If So,

1. Can the order of issuance of note be regarded as 'Expedient Specimen → Specimen → Currency'?

2. Is "Expedient Specimen" more valuable than "Specimen" in the same grade?

3. Is "Expedient" correct to be interpreted as a ' easy and quick way to solve a problem or do something'?

4. Is "Expedient Specimen" also a specimen?
    Does it belong to the category of note?
    In Korea, there are collectors who do not judge it as a proper of specimen.

I have a lot of questions, but please answer them.

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  • Administrator

Good morning,

Thank you for your message.  Unfortunately, I can't provide much more information beyond what was already advised.  Yes, it is considered a specimen but we do not provide values and cannot advise you on how much a note with that designation would be worth.  PMG is a grading company only and we do not buy, sell or value notes.  

As I mentioned before, it is not used frequently and most often seen with notes from World War II.  For more information about this type of note, you might check the book I referenced, WWII Remembered by Schwann-Boling. 

Thank you!

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Good morning!


It was difficult to purchase the book you recommended, so I checked it out now.
However, I have one question, so I ask again.
There are items called ‘vgood’, ‘vfine’, ‘fine’, and ‘new’ where each currency is described, and there are numbers below them.
What does this number mean?
This may be a question that has nothing to do with your company, but I couldn't find an explanation for this, so I'm asking.

Thank you.

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