Split Silver Cert'.
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17 posts in this topic

I wondered if anyone has come across this subject before, I have a 1935a Silver Cert' that has split front from back.....sort of "de-laminated" I am pretty sure it didn't happen in the BEP but wonder if it is a paper fault, as it must be very difficult to do as a deliberate act, don't you think? I did write to what I thought was an expert on this sort of thing but got a very short sharp response, saying that it happened outside the BEP therefore it is not an error.....Which I found a bit disappointing from someone that makes a living from us mere mortal collectors, like he couldn't be bothered.

I would like to add a photo to this post but it seems I only have the choice to enter a URL for the pic....I will certainly upload a photo if I can sort out "how to"

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I don't know the details, but I do know that with some more recent issues the BEP experimented with glues to adhere notes together (I think). However, I doubt that happened during the 1935 issues. Those notes were printed on one sheet of paper - so it does seem unlikely that it is an authentic BEP error.

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Banker, if you want to. You can email the scan to jmderocker@aol.com and I will put it on my FTP server and then post it for you in this thread.

 

Just trying to help out a fellow collector. :idea:

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Yes, I think I remember seeing one last year posted somewhere but I can't remember if the error folks said it was real or not.

 

If memory serves me right, I think they said it was REAL. I'm not an error collector.

 

Sorry my friend. I'm suer there are other collectors on here that are though.

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Banker,

What we've learned is that it was common for men in the military during World War II to peel apart notes during their down time in the field. It was often that men were stationed for long periods of time, so they would sit and peel the notes in half. I once tried it as a kid and it takes a long time to do without tearing a hole in the note. And guess who taught me?...My grandfather who was a veteran of the war! Thanks for the great post.

 

Chad Hawk

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Thank you for the insight, have a guess what I'm gonna do the rest of the day.....I have to try it on a new note, I'm just guessing, but me thinks it's gonna take more than a day and probably more than one note huh?

Anyone else ever tried it?

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Thanks Chad,

One thing you didn't mention.......You say you "tried it" as a kid, how did it go? Were you able to do it? Were you even able to get it started? I've admittedly not spent long on it, but geezz it is not easy....ermmm.. Not easy is a bit of an understatement, freakin' near impossible springs to mind.... :(

Trying to separate 0.0043" (or 43 thou) into two over the entire bill seems incredible, do you think it might have been done in the prison camps? As I reckon they might have had more time on their hands, more so than guys in the field of combat maybe.

Just one other point, I've tried it on a decent 1935 note in case the structure of the paper is different now, which I guess it has to be, right? I also tried it on a new 2006......I'll keep you posted.

Well, I'll let you know when I give up at least. :frustrated:

Cheers

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Thank you for the insight, have a guess what I'm gonna do the rest of the day.....I have to try it on a new note,

 

 

 

This can be done only with notes that were printed by the wet intaglio process, a razor blade, a steady hand, skill with sharp instruments, and plenty of patience. Learned that today while looking at a split note on heritage currency auctions.

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Thanks Goldmine866.

I just took a look at the one on the Heritage listing, I notice that theirs is also a 1935a and the plate numbers are high on both mine and their note 5194/3509 and 5318/3889 respectively, which may suggest they were printed around the same time perhaps, and it may even be that that particular batch of paper was easier to do.....Possibly?

I'm going to search through my old Silver Certs to see if I can find a decent 1935a with high plate numbers also so I can have a go with a fair comparison.....I think also I may soak it a while to see if it might "swell" a little and make things a bit easier.

Thanks again for your input.

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When I started this thread I also wrote to several other sources to see if anyone knew anything of this subject.....I just received this months Bank Note Reporter and low and behold this item is in the reader response section......How cool is that?

I'm still not totally convinced it is 100% man made though, I have tried and tried and can't get anywhere near to doing it, and I would think it is almost certainly impossible to do and not leave a single 'witness' mark of a razor or similar instrument, my suspicion is that it was a faulty roll of paper, or maybe simply a join area in the roll, it could get 'damp' in someone's back pocket and start to come apart.

Strange coincidence happened last weekend, I got the local newspaper here and the third page was 'laminated' ...two thirds of the page was doubled, the join was zig-zagged and there was no printing between the two sheets obviously, so it is a way that paper rolls are produced.

Who knows.....cool subject though huh?

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