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Series Question

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Okay, I understand that the series of a certain bill (lets take the $1 bill as an example) changes if there is a design change or the US Treasurer (UT) or Secretary of the Treasury (ST) changes. The $1 bill hasn't had a face lift in many years, so the only changes are the signatures.

 

My question is, "Why not change the series to the actual year of the change?"

 

Example:

 

In 2001, Marin was the UT and O'Neill was the ST - the $1 changed to Series 2001.

In 2003, Marin was the UT and Snow was the ST - the $1 changed to Series 2003.

In 2004, Cabral was the UT and Snow was the ST - the $1 changed to Series 2003A.

In 2006, Cabral was the UT and Paulson was the ST - the $1 changed to Series 2006.

In 2009, Rios was the UT and Geithner was the ST - the $1 changed to Series 2009.

 

So, why would the 2004 change not make the Series 2004? I would understand this if the change took place mid-year of the current series (ie: In Jan 2012 John Doe was UT and Jane Doe was ST making the $1 Series 2012. In May 2012, John Smith took over as UT and the Series changed to 2012A).

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On the $1 bill, the design hasn't really changed since 1969.

 

The first $1 Federal Reserve Note (FRN) was dated Series 1963, and its design and wording conformed to those of the other denominations in that series. Unlike the $1 Silver Certificate (SC) it replaced, the $1 FRN had the denomination spelled out behind the Treasury seal. But the engraved border of the face design was also completely redone, making for the most radical change to any denomination since the $1 back had been replaced for Series 1935.

 

Engraved signatures returned to the FRNs beginning with Series 1963B. The changeover to the new Treasury seal came with the next series, and was enough to bring about a new series date of 1969 for these notes.

 

1990 Redesign: $1 bill not included in the redesign at all.

 

1996 Redesign: $1 bill not included in the redesign at all.

 

2004 Redesign: $1 bill not included in the redesign at all.

 

True, the design did not change in 2004 - the design hasn't changed since 1969. So why change the Series to another year versus adding a letter or why add a letter instead of changing the year?

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I think the basic rule had been that if it was considered a major change (i.e. a new Treasury Secretary) then it was a new series (2001 to 2003, etc.) but if it was a minor change (just a new Treasurer) then they add the letter. The problem is that the BEP hasn't always been consistent! Before 1974, a change to either the Treasurer or Secretary of the Treasury were both considered minor changes and just got a letter added. Since 1974 it's been the rule I mentioned above, with some strange exceptions, like the change to Secretary of Treasury Miller just resulting in the series 1977A, or the most recent and rather bizarre example of the series 2006 $5 note, which includes the old style green note and the new colorized notes with the big purple 5.

 

 

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