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Imaging notes - raw or certified

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Hello folks,

 

Just wondering - how do all of you image your notes? I'm currently using a Visioneer OneTouch 9320 USB scanner set to 300 dpi and cropping with Photoshop. However, the quality still isn't as crisp as it should be. Here is an example of a certified note:

 

B0159LG.jpg

 

and here is a raw note:

 

B0191LG.jpg

 

Granted, the images are decent, but I know there has to be a way to make them a lot sharper so people can really see how the notes look in hand.

 

By the way, I collect uncirculated high-grade Wisconsin obsoletes, so if you have any, feel free to let me know :)

 

--Zach "Beast" Beasley

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You might try increasing the DPI, pre-crop before the scan if you can, (Most scanners will let you do a lower res scan, crop to the size you actually want to scan, then reset the res higher and do the high res scan. ) then resize the image to the size you want to post.

 

You will almost certainly have to actually work the setting for the scan yourself. A scanner where you just press a single button on the scanner just uses preset settings and won't work as well. You get an ok image but not a QUALITY image.It's like the difference between someone who shoots family pictures with an instant point and shoot camera, and a pro using an SLR camera. Sorry, I grew up with film, but the point an shoot digitals have the same shortcomings over someone who uses a better cammera and adjust the settings himself.

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Thanks Conder - I'll keep messing about with it. I had to make a number of changes to get the scans I am getting, which look fantastic and very sharp in the native scan (Paperport .max file) but lose a ton of detail when converting to .jpg

 

--Beast

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Check out the method described in this thread. If you've ever browsed some of the other boards, you've likely seen some of "Rock's" scans...and they're awesome!

 

RJ

 

THANKS RJ! And I just happen to have the same scanner and Photoshop. I'm off to go set up my table at the ANA show for the rest of the week, but I will definitely give this a try on whatever currency I pick up at the show.

 

Thanks again!

 

--Beast

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Check out the method described in this thread. If you've ever browsed some of the other boards, you've likely seen some of "Rock's" scans...and they're awesome!

 

RJ

 

RJ - I couldn't wait to give this a try and all I needed to do was use the sharpen tool at the end of the process. Here are the results:

 

Before:

 

B0207oldLG.jpg

 

After:

 

B0207LG.jpg

 

T H A N K S !!!

 

I'll have to go back and edit all of the rest of the images, but that can wait until I get back from the show.

 

--Beast

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One thing to keep in mind, though honestly I'm not 100% certain on this one: I believe that scanners are set to focus on an image ON the scanner bed. As opposed to an object just above it, which is what happens with currency that's certified. That could have something to do with it.

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One thing to keep in mind, though honestly I'm not 100% certain on this one: I believe that scanners are set to focus on an image ON the scanner bed. As opposed to an object just above it, which is what happens with currency that's certified. That could have something to do with it.

I think so too. It seems when I scan a slab for a coin, it can almost focus on the label, but not so much on the coin itself; which is set back in the slab.

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It is correct. Scanners were designed for scanning documents. Flat two dimensional images placed right against the glass. So that is where the scanner is set to focus. That is probably why in the earlier years of scanners the cheaper models did better job of scanning coins than the expensive scanners. The expensive one had less depth of field and a more precise focus right at the surface of the glass. It made for great scanned documents, nice and sharp, but not for scanning slabbed coins that were away from the glass. The cheaper ones with the less precise focus had a greater depth of field and the coin would still be within the focus area.

 

I think the scanners now compensate for it some because the manufacturers know that people do use them for items other than documents. But I think the cheaper scanners probably still do a better job on slabs than higher end ones do.

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i like my old hp2300c scanjet. but you need the new software to run on vista.you can still find these scanners all over i just baught another 2 just incase. even works good on rings :P and gems :)

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