This time it is Veracruz

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ColonialCoinsUK

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Like coins I seem incapable of just accumulating random notes and need to 'organize' them into some form of set. The diversity of Mexican currency during this period means there is great potential for numerous sets, however one obvious set that I have been considering is one note, any note, from each of the 30 states.

The dos caritas 10 pesos note from my first PMG Journal was issued in Chihuahua so that became State No1 - it appears I have quite a few notes from this large northern state which will no doubt start mulitple other groupings.:ph34r: The next note I mentioned was a 20 pesos note where the otters on the Tampico Coat of Arms seem to have morphed into dogs on the back of the note. This added Tamaulipas as State No2.

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State No3 is going to be Vercacruz, highlighted by this 5 Pesos note (S437s, M528s) issued by El Banco Mercantil de Veracruz from 1899 until 1910, another Specimen note. The 5 Pesos was the lowest, and most common denomination issued by the bank but like many of the original state banks this one didn't survive the revolution when Carranza as the new President cancelled all their charters in an attempt to centralise the banking system. This note shows a seated female figure (representing the city?) on the front with her back to the harbour surrounded by references to the local industries and commerce; mining tools, agricultural products and the train line. The back of the note depicts another view of the docks as Veracruz, like Tampico, is a major port and remains critical to the Mexican economy today although the fortress of St Juan de Ulua could do with some restoration.:o

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So at February 2022 the Mexican states acquired are:-

No1: Chihuahua
No2: Tamaulipas
No3: Veracruz

So 3/30 at the moment, only 27 to go, some are going to be difficult, due to both limited availability and/or that they are expensive but it is the challenge and it is striving for completion that keeps us young!

 

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Although I have a few specimen and remainder notes, and therefore nice examples of the artwork, it turns out they are often cheaper than the equivalent grade circulated note if you can even fine one. So far just the smaller, and thus common, denominations :)

Having said that I am waiting for some notes that are at the completely other end of the quality spectrum but I am hoping they will be interesting for a different reason :ph34r:

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Your comment about the allegory representing the city is interesting, any reason you think city as opposed to say, Liberty, Demeter, etc.? The pillared chair is interesting, does that tie into the current city coat of arms or city seal? Sorry if I'm asking too many questions, it's what I do, and I love banknotes. (thumbsu 

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Female figures also seem to be used to represent cities and/or states - this is certainly the case in Europe. It doesn't appear to be the common representations of liberty, justice, victory etc as the items usually associated with these do not seem to be there and what is covers a range of things.

Well spotted, the coat of arms for Veracruz does have a pair of pillars on it so I am leaning towards the lady representing the city/state.

This could all be completely wrong of course but adding banknotes to my collection has just highlighted how little I know about anything.:roflmao:

Edit. My first thought was that it could be the roman goddess Pax - often seated holding an olive branch. Great - I now have to see if I can find whether the American Bank Note company call her anything?:|

Edited by ColonialCoinsUK
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On 2/26/2022 at 4:51 AM, ColonialCoinsUK said:

Female figures also seem to be used to represent cities and/or states - this is certainly the case in Europe. It doesn't appear to be the common representations of liberty, justice, victory etc as the items usually associated with these do not seem to be there and what is covers a range of things.

I would think it is a representation of the city/state as well, and how well to do it is. That this was issued prior to the revolution makes sense to me as well, the allegory is seated hands resting on the pillars of the chair (not holding the sword, maybe the two pillars represent twins which would give credence to this being Pax), wearing a laurel wreath and a 'cornucopia' laid out before her. It's an interesting depiction, it's like, yeah, we know what we have, we're bad arse better not mess us. It'll be interesting to see if you find anything from ABNC about this, or what they we're trying to depict/represent. 

I crack myself up sometimes, my interpretations of vignettes can be out there sometimes. lol

Edited by Fenntucky Mike
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