Bruce Thornton

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Posts posted by Bruce Thornton

  1. We are waving the 5 note minimum for this special deal. Notes graded using the Sheldon scale we will be charged normal tier rates per note and the notes will be encapsulated into separate holders using the appropriate Fr# for the note (unless you wish to encapsulate them in a multiholder which will require an additional fee) and will be pedigreed "BEP 150th Anniversary Set"

     

  2. Roger I complete agree about the $2, I've talked to several people about this as well.

    I think it would be a fantastic program just imagine how good the back of a $2 bill could look with the national parks on the back of them with all of that real estate to work with. :) Could be pretty amazing.

     

    I agree with Steve. The only reason I believe the dollar coin does not circulate is because the $1 bill still does. Let's get those $2 out there circulating.

     

    Then again, I thought that instead of the ATB quarters that are now being producted we should have done ATB $2 bills. Putting a National park theme on the back of the $2 bill would make a beautiful note. This would create interest in $2 bills and the increase use/colelcting of them while incorporating the $1 coin.

     

    I have also read that the poly notes are used mostly in countries with a much smaller currency printing number than the U.S. Do not know this as a fact but would make sense.

  3. It seems like the momentum is gaining towards getting rid of the $1 bill

    Link and fully replacing it with the dollar coin.

     

    I would like to pose a different suggestion, instead of switching to coins why not do like Canada and other countries have done and switch over to polymer notes.

    They have a proven track record, Australia has been making polymer notes for around 20 plus years and the stats have shown that polymer notes last anywhere from 2.5-5 times as long in circulation as paper notes and have shown significant savings over their paper counterparts in some case cutting costs by over 50%. They are less like to transmit disease as polymer plastic is inert, they are recyclable, and have led to a dramatic reduction in counterfeiting in the countries which have made the switch.

    They can also just go right into your wallet, unlike the dollar coins which can be a burden to carry around in your pocket as change.

     

    Before my days as a grader at PMG, I would carry around dollar coins when setting up as a dealer at coin shows just to hand out in change as I thought it might create some interest being that it is not something that a non-collector sees on a regular basis and cannot even remember how many times, even coin collectors would ask me if they could please have one dollar bills instead because they didn't want to have to carry those heavy coins around.

     

    I'm putting together an article on this subject to run in the near future and was curious to get some collector feedback.

    What are your thoughts?

  4. These are notes from the German hyperinflation in the early 1920s, the top one is 5 billion marks, the bottom one is 50 billion marks. In German a millionen is the equivalent of a billion in English, while a billionen is the equivalent of a trillion in English. Interesting notes, but most of these don't have a high value since so many millions were printed (they were eventually used for cooking since the notes were cheaper than firewood). I don't know if these are rare varieties, so I'll defer to any experts on the board, but if they are common they might be worth a dollar or two.

     

    This :)

  5. It is issued on standard banknote paper with a watermark as a security measure, up to now i have 3 different pound notes. There are also £5, £10 and most unusually a £21 note.

     

    Wow, a £21 note...Quite Strange

     

     

    Kinda makes me think of the interesting story behind "Hutt River Province" and it's coinage and currency.

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