mintcollector

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Posts posted by mintcollector

  1. Paper money collectors are active and well. While it is true that there are more coin collectors than currency collectors, the number of currency collectors is rising. By nature, notes are much more scarcer to find in high grades. That being said, and I cannot speak for everyone,a lot of paper money collectors (or at least some) do collect in private.

     

    Respectfully yours,

     

    'mint'

  2. I understand that I may not get too many responses with this being the holiday weekend and all; but I have been studying the Don Kelly book on National Bank Notes for the past year. What is the market like?

     

    Is it even worth collecting for states like Pennsylvania (my home state) or should I collect other areas?

     

    Any thoughts on this topic are appreciated, as I can't find too much on the internet in the way of National Bank Note collecting.

     

    Thanks and Happy New Year!

  3. My son is in the up to $30 range. I don't mind spending up to a couple hundred per note for 65 PMG.

     

    Depends on what you buy. The 1929 FRN series are a good buy right now, in my opinion. I am sure your son is building a nice collection, for his price range. It is nice that young people are involved in collecting currency.

  4. I'll take a $10,000 small size note over a large size Martha Washington note all day long.

     

    I would to, but the original poster asked about notes in 64/65 condition. How many $10,000 notes are left in this condition, and how much do they cost? Compare a Martha note (as you state in your example) with any comparably priced small size note, and I assure you people would be impressed with the large size note, if only for the uniqueness of the item in question.

     

    Good point, though...

     

    I was attempting to add a bit of humor.

     

    Personally, I think the 1899 Chief and 1901 Bison are of fantastic design, and I like them better than the Educationals. A really neat note with a very interesting history is the 1900 $10,000. I am happy to own all three of these, and I encourage those new to the hobby to view high grade examples "in hand" if given the opportunity. With respect to small size notes, my preference is for the 1928 gold certificates -- the higher the denomination the better!

     

     

    It is all good. I personally collect US currency from 1935 and earlier.

  5. Thanks for the replies. I agree about the "wow" factor on large size (after all, bigger is better). I'm more interested in your thoughts on the market for collecting small size market.

     

    Do you think 64/65 material is fairly priced now, or does it represent a bargain?

     

    In large size (which I currently collect), we generally don't have the issue of what block something came from impacting the value. Does it really matter?

     

    My son is almost 11. He started at age 7 with common foreign and us coins. He traded those to get some better ones. He sold those to buy foreign paper money that he thought looked cool. He traded and sold that to the point where he has now focusing on older Philippines, Mexico and Brazil. He's got the eye for American Bank Note stuff. He likes the engravings and the fact that it looks like American money. When we go to shows dealers are blown away by a kid his age collecting paper money, that is not in the junk boxes.

     

    Anyway, I can see "the wheels turning," and he has his eye on "funnybacks," and red seals.

    So, I am considering purchasing for him for the future (to give as gifts for his enjoyment but with an investment potential), 64/65 PMG red seals, blue seals, and WWII stuff.

     

     

    What is your price range? This is the most important question of all.

  6. I'll take a $10,000 small size note over a large size Martha Washington note all day long.

     

    I would to, but the original poster asked about notes in 64/65 condition. How many $10,000 notes are left in this condition, and how much do they cost? Compare a Martha note (as you state in your example) with any comparably priced small size note, and I assure you people would be impressed with the large size note, if only for the uniqueness of the item in question.

     

    Good point, though...

  7. Hello,

     

    No, I do not think the small size market will ever get to the point where it is on par with the large size market. It is like comparing apples to oranges. When I show someone who is a non-collector, a large size note, I get a much different response then when I show them a small size note. Look at the beauty of an educational note and find a small size comparison. You cannot.

     

    That being said, as soon as the current economic downturn is over, I do expect the market to heat up again. I do not expect the same kind of growth we saw in the last ten years though, as I believe that was mainly due to third party grading.

     

    Large size notes will always be in a league of their own. That being said, collect what you like. There are some small size notes that carry incredible premiums. Large size notes just get all the attention in some cases.

     

     

  8. I hardly consider TPG grading populations as censuses...... the vast majority of notes in any serious census are comprised of serial numbers, very, very few of them TPG graded.

     

    Track and Price gives census numbers of all known notes...... TPG graded or not... if were otherwise, a census would be totally worthless.

     

    Thank you, as I have never used Track and Price. The only census information I know of is completely inaccurate and skewed...as it is the TPG market reports.

     

     

  9. Virtually any census that contains 1928 $10 Gold Certificates.... I believe that Track and Price is one that does (I could be wrong about that), but if a person was informed as to why the gold certificates were removed from circulation, the consequences for not redeeming them, and what they were replaced by, it would become clear that even a 99% redemption is far too low, unless that same person actually feels that there are more than 1.3 million of these notes still outstanding.

     

    This would not be correct. This is because the majority of notes available on the marketplace are NOT certified. Not everyone slabs their notes, and it is estimated that less than ten to twenty percent of all high grade items are certified.

     

    Therefore if you are using an analysis with census of graded notes only; you are not getting an accurate figure.

     

    Though I don't know if Track and Price gives raw census estimates?

  10. The most accurate way of determining how many of the 1928 $10 gold certificates were destroyed would be to search census data for the number of notes known to exist. Subtract that from the number originally printed, and you will see that over 99% were destroyed. (It would have been 100% if the BEP had its way).

     

    What census are you referring to?

  11. I believe they do have a version for Macs, but am unsure. I am a huge Apple user as well!

     

    That being said, I have never used their service, but know of several collectors who have. I would advise you to start researching completed auctions, as this will help you get a feel for the market.