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Extremely Low Serial Number Star Note.. Need Advice

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What is the year of the note?

 

How is the condition?

 

If it's a newer note in poor condition, it's probably not worth that much. Fancy serial numbers on notes are difficult to price. I had two $1 silver certificates with fancy serials; a 1935 F Priest-Anderson Z-I Block and a 1957 B Granahan-Dillon W-A Block, both in pretty rough condition.

 

In a 10-day auction on eBay starting at $15.00 the 1935 F only received 3 bids from 2 bidders with a final selling price of $16.50.

 

And in a 10-day auction on eBay starting at $15.00 the 1957 B received no bids, however I ended up selling it for $10 after re-listing it in the buy-it-now format. I made a post of it and you can see the notes here: http://boards.collectors-society.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=7527722

 

I would recommend looking at eBay for comparables. However, don't forget there is a big...huge...enormous difference between what a person is asking for something and what someone else is willing to pay for it. In short, asking prices are not always fair market values. You can list a penny for a million bucks. But that doesn't mean that's its value. So check the sold listings on eBay first.

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As I have stated about the comments before about star notes in this forum.... Ignore Them. The comments sound like dealers who do not want to tell you a true value thinking they might be able to buy something on the cheap.

 

Collectors rarely see a two digit note plucked from circulation. A 2 digit star is rarer than hens teeth and worth more than face, even in the condition yours is in. Of course condition is everything. If this were crisp uncirculated one might expect it to realize 100+ dollars, even on ebay.

 

I wouldn't waste my time or money with a grading service though, especially considering the condition this one is in. They, I believe, will charge you a fee based on what they think the note is worth. It's too their advantage to tell you it's extremely valuable. They then made their money and you may never recoup what you put into it. From the image I would hazard a guess of vf-xf. Keep the note. If you are just beginning to collect paper, or star notes, it's a great start.

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Grading services do not charge based on the value of a note unless it is an extremely valuable one (and this would not meet that threshold).

 

Although I do not routinely submit notes, it is my understanding that the only increased charges one might incur from the TPG based on the value of a given note are assessed only to cover the increased insured value when shipping the note back to you.

 

I believe that a conservation service, if used when having a coin or note graded, does charge based upon the determined value once graded.

 

I agree with the others that this notes condition does not seem to justify grading and encapsulating.

 

Cool find though, nonetheless!

 

 

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Vey cool note and IMO worth alot more than face value even in its condition. By alot I would think double or triple face to the right collector. As stated above I would check the sold listing on ebay for what the approximate value would be. I, like you am new to collecting, (about a year) but have learned alot from different forums and auction sold listings.

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Agree with all the posts. Condition is the only issue. In this case, don't sell it to a dealer because of the condition and don't get it graded. There is most likely a collector out there who specifically wants low digit star notes. And agreeing, probably in the $25-$30 range is a reasonable expectation.

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